Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDíaz Menéndez, Begoña
dc.contributor.authorBlank, Helen
dc.contributor.authorVon Kriegstein, Katharina
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-29T08:51:09Z
dc.date.available2021-06-29T08:51:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationDíaz Menéndez, Begoña; Blank, Helen; Von Kriegstein, Katharina. Task-dependent modulation of the visual sensory thalamus assists visual-speech recognition. NeuroImage, 2018, 178, p. 721-734. Disponible en: <https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1053811918304397?via%3Dihub>. Fecha de acceso: 29 jun. 2021. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.05.032ca
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12328/2661
dc.description.abstractThe cerebral cortex modulates early sensory processing via feed-back connections to sensory pathway nuclei. The functions of this top-down modulation for human behavior are poorly understood. Here, we show that top-down modulation of the visual sensory thalamus (the lateral geniculate body, LGN) is involved in visual-speech recognition. In two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, LGN response increased when participants processed fast-varying features of articulatory movements required for visual-speech recognition, as compared to temporally more stable features required for face identification with the same stimulus material. The LGN response during the visual-speech task correlated positively with the visual-speech recognition scores across participants. In addition, the task-dependent modulation was present for speech movements and did not occur for control conditions involving non-speech biological movements. In face-to-face communication, visual speech recognition is used to enhance or even enable understanding what is said. Speech recognition is commonly explained in frameworks focusing on cerebral cortex areas. Our findings suggest that task-dependent modulation at subcortical sensory stages has an important role for communication: Together with similar findings in the auditory modality the findings imply that task-dependent modulation of the sensory thalami is a general mechanism to optimize speech recognition.en
dc.format.extent58ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherElsevierca
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageca
dc.relation.ispartofseries178;
dc.rights© 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
dc.subject.otherRessonància magnètica funcionalca
dc.subject.otherNucli geniculat lateralca
dc.subject.otherLectura de llavisca
dc.subject.otherParlaca
dc.subject.otherResonancia magnética funcionales
dc.subject.otherNúcleo geniculado laterales
dc.subject.otherLectura de labioses
dc.subject.otherHablaes
dc.subject.otherFunctional MRIen
dc.subject.otherLateral geniculate nucleusen
dc.subject.otherLipreadingen
dc.subject.otherSpeechen
dc.titleTask-dependent modulation of the visual sensory thalamus assists visual-speech recognitionen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.subject.udc61ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.05.032ca


Files in this item

 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/